The Witcher 3 Review

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Contrary to its predecessor The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt doesn’t exactly make a splash from the beginning line. When compared with The Witcher 2, where you’re immediately sucked into a thrilling tale of betrayal and intrigue, the main storyline can appear dull, and even boring at times. However, each time I ventured away from the well-worn route to follow my own path It turned into an open, wild thrilling fantasy adventure that is full of opportunities to take advantage of its superb combat. Even after more than 100 hours playing The Witcher 3, it is still a great incentive to keep pressing further – there’s a lot more I’d like to discover and explore.

It’s a great game. Witcher 3 is as dense and deep as the previous two titles in the collection in terms RPG mechanics. The enormous open-world world has simultaneously made the experience more difficult, and ultimately enjoyable. It’s difficult to convey just the sheer size and scope of this place is. The lush landscapes, rolling fields filled with lush, swaying plants in all shapes and sizes are scattered across the towns that are loosely connected and ramshackle that struggle to scrape through. A complete day/night cycle and the dynamic weather bring the entire thing together, establishing The Witcher 3’s scenery to be one of the more realistic open-worlds I’ve seen. A helpful minimap will guide you to where you’d like to go. It may appear like a gimmick but, honestly without it, I’d lost for a long time. The fact that a place this big remains so focused and filled with things to do is quite an accomplishment.

One thing to note about everything concerns the performance of technical aspects of as well games on the Xbox One and PS4 versions. 30-fps is sometimes too much as were the changes among The Witcher’s two maps that are the main ones The game is a bit long, and minor issues occur at times. The game never impacted the gameplay in any way, but it did affect the overall quality of the experience little. Fortunately, PC players can expect to have a lot more. With the GTX 980, Witcher 3 played in 60 frames per minute, with any time on high settings.This game’s new map that is open to the world clearly has implications to the structure of the story and even though there are moments of brilliance, the primary story is by far the least satisfying aspect that is The Witcher 3. It could be described as a second version from The Elder Scrolls Syndrome.

The story starts as an international search for the long-lost love of Geralt. Yennifer and Ciri the surrogate daughter of his. My biggest complaint, however is that it isn’t any more than the long main story is Geralt doing errands for individuals in exchange for information about Ciri’s whereabouts. It keeps the its focus and speed, but it’s more like an unending chase rather instead of a fascinating mystery to be solved, similar to the one in the film Assassins of King.

With a wealth of great voice-overs and dialogue, there’s some reward for emotion in the process However, it’s interspersed with a lot of padding that comes in the form insignificant fetch quests and collectionathons. Each time I thought I was in the midst of making a breakthrough I’d need to take a break to help the goat or look for an undiscovered or narcoleptic dwarf. In fact, even Geralt could not hide his anger from the continuous stream of routine tasks.

It’s also important to note that, even if you be able to get by without playing both the games of the series, and without the context of those Witcher books, Ciri is more or than not a stranger until the end of the game, which caused me to be unable to care about her appearance in the way The Witcher 3 had me to – particularly given the multitude of interesting characters assigned supporting roles in the background.

The good news is that they all have a chance to shine when you step off the well-worn path, and that’s exactly where The Witcher 3 gets nearly everything perfectly. Based on the choices you make made in The Witcher 2 (which can be easily recreated through dialogue in the beginning of the game) There are a variety of familiar characters returning to participate in Geralt’s hunt and, once they’ve the chance, they’ll offer you another set of quests that usually offer an array of more intriguing situations to play. Underground turf conflicts, assassination plots romance triangles and unexpected alliances are all included in these unintentional romps. They’re all so hefty and filled with rich narrative content that they make it seem as if they were in the same story.

It’s the same for many of the side quests that you can find in the field , too. Apart from the myriad of regular side-quests, monster lairs and bandsit camps that are all over The Witcher 3’s massive area of land Additionally, you will find several monster-hunting Witcher contracts that you can pursue. Geralt’s hunt for wraiths ranges from ethereal creatures which require to be transformed into tangible objects before you can attack them, to Foglets who hide themselves in the thick smog and wait for the chance to strike. There are two benefits to this as per the legend, they are the most reliable source of income. This is very refreshing because of the sluggish game economy.

Another benefit is that most of the time hunting and other related activities offer fascinating perspectives on a country which is being destroyed due to war and the various forces that play an important role in shaping the landscape. Most importantly, you’re one of them. This may not alter the plot’s outcome in huge ways however, I’ve often gone back to places I’d previously visited to discover that a minor decision was interpreted in a huge way. There’s no morality gauge and no paragon or ratings for renegades. In the world of grayscale in The Witcher 3, there is only cause and effect. the choices you make regardless of how big or small, will change your world, much more than other games that claim to do the same.

Character development and choices in equipment have a significant impact on character progression and equipment choices. Comparatively To The Witcher 2, I discovered that the Witcher 3 RPG systems have been simplified in certain ways, but complicated in other. However, in both cases it’s identical: a better experience. The ease of restocking and apply oils and potions can make them more practical and immediate in that you don’t require meditative time to do all of it. It’s true that the old method was more in tune with Witcher legends and mythology, but in a vast open world, it’s not making sense to have players be able to anticipate everything they’ll encounter prior to. On the other hand there’s a greater variety of potions with a lot of power as ever before, such as those that can greatly improve the effectiveness of combat in mounted form, as well as others which boost your health when you use spells (or Signs as Witchers refer to them).

In terms of Signs They’ve been upgraded throughout the game with a variety of casting methods, as well as an array of improvements which make them effective in every battle. It’s entirely possible to design a Geralt based on signs. I played him as an actual Jedi in reality, with the ability to influence the minds of others during conversations, an effective long-range “force” push as well as the capability for crossbow bolts to be reflected back towards the sender (a returning capability that’s now much more accessible). A new skills system gives players an abundance of flexibility and still rewards players who seek out the maximum and minimum build as well as armor and weapon crafting is as rich and intricate as ever and if not more.

This is evident in the game’s fluid violent, real-time battle. Combat in the series has until this point seemed a bit vague and even a little awkward however, now it’s fluid and enjoyable that I’m waiting for my enemies to jump at me to defend myself against their attacks using magical barriers, block their attacks with incredible accuracy, and then relieve the enemy of life or limb with a sly grin. In the past, The Witcher did an excellent work of making me feel like I’ve beaten my adversaries and for the first time that Geralt’s control feels tangible good-looking with each successful fight.

Verdict

Although the simple and fetch-quest-heavy main plot does not meet the expectations however, the possibility of enjoying exploring a vast large vast world of open space was available to me whenever I was beginning to feel exhausted. Even if the plot itself isn’t particularly engaging, the various characters that are featured in it are. And in addition to the superb combat and RPG-like gameplay They elevate The Witcher 3 to a level that few other RPGs can reach.

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